Riparian Vegetation

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VegetationMonitoring.jpg

LTEMP Resource Goal for Riparian Vegetation

Maintain native vegetation and wildlife habitat, in various stages of maturity, such that they are diverse, healthy, productive, self-sustaining, and ecologically appropriate.

Desired Future Condition for Native Species and Biotic Communities

Nonfish Biotic Communities:
Native non-fish aquatic biota and their habitats are sustainably maintained with ecologically appropriate distributions.
• Populations of native non-fish species (invertebrates and vertebrates, including Northern Leopard Frog).
- AMP support, actions and funding are limited to incorporation of dam operations which are conducive to restoration of extirpated species.
• Minimize the abundance and distribution of non-native species in the CRE.
• Sustainable dam-influenced aquatic, wetland, and springs plant communities and associated biological processes, including those supporting threatened and endangered species and their habitats.

CRE Riparian Domain:
Native riparian systems, in various stages of maturity, are diverse, healthy, productive, self-sustaining, and ecologically appropriate.
• Native, self-sustaining riverine wetlands, and riparian vegetation and habitat, with appropriate mixture of age classes.
• Healthy, self-sustaining populations of native riparian fauna (both resident and migratory).
• Habitat for sensitive species within the CRE
• Encourage the resolution of the taxonomic status of the Kanab ambersnail (e.g., completely describe the taxa and subspecies).
• Habitat for neotropical migratory birds, waterfowl, and other appropriate native bird species.
• Ecological functions of tributary mouths and riverside springs, including habitat for native species.

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Updates

Riparian Vegetation

VegMonitoring 1964 2013.jpg
[1]
VegMonitoring summary.jpg
[2]
TamariskBeetle.jpg
[3]

Links and Documents

Vegetation Projects

Hidden Slough in Glen Canyon

Papers and Presentations

2017

2016

2015

2013

2012

2010

LTEMP Experimental Action: Native and Nonnative Plant Management and Experimental Treatments (BA, pages 41-42) [4]

Experimental riparian vegetation treatment activities would be implemented by NPS under the proposed action and would modify the cover and distribution of riparian plant communities along the Colorado River. All activities would be consistent with NPS Management Policies (NPS 2006) and would occur only within the Colorado River Ecosystem in areas that are influenced by dam operations. NPS would work with tribal partners and GCMRC to experimentally implement and evaluate a number of vegetation control and native replanting activities on the riparian vegetation within the Colorado River Ecosystem in GCNP and GCNRA. These activities would include ongoing monitoring and removal of selected nonnative plant species, systematic removal of nonnative vegetation at targeted sites, and native replanting at targeted sites, which may include complete removal of tamarisk (both live and dead) and re-vegetation with native plants. Treatments would include the control of nonnative plant species and revegetation with native plant species.

Experimental Vegetation Treatment and Mitigation (LTEMP ROD pg 19)

As part of LTEMP, experimental riparian vegetation treatment was included as mitigation for dam operations within CRE. Vegetation treatment actions on NPS managed lands will be implemented by NPS consistent with NPS Management Policies (NPS 2006) and will occur only within the CRE in areas that are influenced by dam operations. The NPS will work with tribal partners and GCMRC to experimentally implement and evaluate a number of vegetation control and native replanting activities on the riparian vegetation within the Colorado River Ecosystem in GCNP and GCNRA. These activities would include ongoing monitoring and removal of selected nonnative plants, species in the corridor, systematic removal of nonnative vegetation at targeted sites, and native replanting at targeted sites and subreaches, which may include complete removal of tamarisk (both live and dead) and revegetation with native vegetation. Treatments would fall into two broad categories, including the control of nonnative plant species and revegetation with native plant species. Principal elements of this experimental riparian vegetation proposal include:

  • Control nonnative plant species affected by dam operations, including tamarisk and other highly invasive species;
  • Develop native plant materials for replanting through partnerships and the use of regional greenhouses;
  • Replant native plant species to priority sites along the river corridor, including native species of interest to tribes;
  • Remove vegetation encroaching on campsites; and
  • Manage vegetation to assist with cultural site protection.

Other Stuff

General Plant Species

  • Approximately 129 vegetation communities, Over 850 species have been reported from GCNRA, and over 1,750 vascular plant species from GCNP (NPS CFMP-EA_pg 19)
  1. Riparian communities are dominated by species such as coyote and seep willows, arrowweed, western honey mesquite, catclaw acacia, and exotic tamarisk with many other species present.
  2. Desert Scrub communities are dominated by species such as creosote, white bursage, brittle bush, ocotillo, four-wing saltbush, big sagebrush, ephedra, dropseed, brome grasses, and many other species.
  3. Approximately 11% of flora in GCNP and GC reach is exotic.